For serious astronomy

All online orders will continue to be processed and shipped with our delivery partners who uphold high hygiene standards. Take care and remember to keep a social distance! JavaScript seems to be disabled in your browser. You must have JavaScript enabled in your browser to utilize the functionality of this website. Featuring a selection of high powered, large Refractor, Maksutov- Cassegrains and 8", 10", 12" inch Dobsonian Telescopes for professionals and those who engage in serious astronomy.

OpticsCentral is able to Price Match some Australian retailers on telescopes and sports optics we can NOT price match cameras and accessories. As a part of our Price Match policy, we hope to be able to provide the best price we can for our customers without undercutting ourselves.

We try to provide competitive pricing when possible, but cannot always guarantee the best price. We make up for any discrepancy in price differences by aiming to provide superior customer service!

A few basics in regards to our Price Match policy:. Please note this is a price match Policy and not a price match Guarantee. We make no promises on matching any competitor prices. Also find out any shipping costs which apply, and make sure the product is definitely in stock with the competitor. Check that the competitor is carrying Australian products.

A list of suppliers we can price match can be found below. If in doubt, contact our supplier and find out if they supply the competitor with that particular product. Check our costing. The competitor may have leftover promotional stock that we can not price match.

If our cost price is too high, we will not be able to match them in price. At OpticsCentral, we want you to be happy with your purchase!

If you have any problems with your order within 30 days of purchase, we are happy to help you out with an Exchange or Refund. No problem! If you would like to return an item to us for an Exchange or Refund, we are happy to do so within 30 days of purchase as long as the item is in its original condition with all of the original packaging.

Simply contact our Customer Service team via the Contact Us page or call us on and we will issue you with a Return Authority for your product. Please note that return shipping is at the expense of the customer and Refunds will exclude the original shipping fees.The Chemung Mine operated from the early s throughand going there today feels like stepping back in time.

At Bryce CanyonAstronomy Rangers will take you on a special tour to see the skies, where park representatives say you can see some 7, stars on a moonless night. This national park in Florida has clear night skies because of dry weather, according to Mehmedinovic. Camping on Garden Key is a great way to enjoy the view. Crater Lake is the deepest lake in the countryformed more than 7, years ago when an eruption caused the collapse of a volcano.

This national monument towers into the sky. Where to Find the Darkest Skies in the U. By Talia Avakian May 23, Save Pin ellipsis More. Timelapse filmmakers Harun Mehmedinovic and Gavin Heffernan have spent three years traveling to more than locations to capture the magnificence of the last truly dark skies. Before teaming up to shoot at night, the two had not realized how big of a problem light pollution was.

They decided to use their narrative filmmaking and storytelling skills to raise awareness, teaming up with the International Dark Sky Association, and using data from amateur astronomers and light pollution metrics from the National Park Service. The pair also released a book with all the dark sky locations they visited. Related: The best national park in every U.

For those in search of galactic views, here are 13 destinations to add to your list.

Where to Find the Darkest Skies in the U.S. for Serious Stargazing

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Best telescopes for the money – 2020 reviews and guide

Close View image.Sirius is a binary star consisting of a main-sequence star of spectral type A0 or A1, termed Sirius A, and a faint white dwarf companion of spectral type DA2, termed Sirius B.

The distance between the two varies between 8. Sirius appears bright because of its intrinsic luminosity and its proximity to the Solar System. At a distance of 2.

Sirius is gradually moving closer to the Solar System, so it will slightly increase in brightness over the next 60, years. After that time, its distance will begin to increase, and it will become fainter, but it will continue to be the brightest star in the Earth's night sky for the nextyears. It is 25 times more luminous than the Sun [12] but has a significantly lower luminosity than other bright stars such as Canopus or Rigel.

The system is between and million years old. The more massive of these, Sirius B, consumed its resources and became a red giant before shedding its outer layers and collapsing into its current state as a white dwarf around million years ago. Sirius is known colloquially as the " Dog Star ", reflecting its prominence in its constellationCanis Major the Greater Dog.

For Serious Astronomy - Test

The brightest star in the night sky, Sirius is recorded in some of the earliest astronomical records. Its displacement from the ecliptic causes its heliacal rising to be remarkably regular compared to other stars, with a period of almost exactly The Egyptians continued to note the times of Sirius's annual return, which may have led them to the discovery of the year Sothic cycle and influenced the development of the Julian and Alexandrian calendars.

The ancient Greeks observed that the appearance of Sirius heralded the hot and dry summer and feared that it caused plants to wilt, men to weaken, and women to become aroused. To Greek observers, this signified emanations that caused its malignant influence. It was described as "burning" or "flaming" in literature. If it rose clear, it would portend good fortune; if it was misty or faint then it foretold or emanated pestilence. Coins retrieved from the island from the 3rd century BC feature dogs or stars with emanating rays, highlighting Sirius's importance.

He depicted it as one of six red-coloured stars see the Colour controversy section below. The other five are class M and K stars, such as Arcturus and Betelgeuse. Bright stars were important to the ancient Polynesians for navigation of the Pacific Ocean.Price drops for semi-pro astronomy gear have put some impressive equipment in the hands of astrophotographer hobbyists. Here you'll meet some of the best DIY astrophotographers in this growing subculture. But don't call them amateurs -- these terrestrial space explorers have some of the most sophisticated rigs outside the pros, and they know how to use them.

Some are so good they're given access to the biggest telescopes available, including the Spitzer Space Telescopes. And while gear counts, some have very modest rigs. Many skills are necessary, but one of the most crucial is mastery of Photoshop. The best cosmic images are usually assembled from scores of different exposures.

for serious astronomy

The price tags of these setups may seem steep for the casual enthusiast, but the staggering images they capture are worth the down payment. Left: John Chumack is a research associate at the University of Dayton who has been photographing the night sky for 20 years.

for serious astronomy

His photographs have been published in National GeographicScience and Discoveryand his work has been featured on the cover of Time. Chumack observes most often from the Chumack Observatories Yellow Springs Research Station in Ohio, but he has enough luggable equipment to take on the road to capture images where the seeing is best. He has another observatory at his home in Dayton, Ohio.

for serious astronomy

His primary telescope is a homemade inch F4. These are housed in a metropolis of observation domes. Because astrophotos require long exposures, John can have his whole fleet of telescopes observing different targets at the same time. For the budding astrophotographer, Chumack suggests starting slowly and building up gear within budget. Forget the bells and whistles for now. This monster lets him gather pictures that rival many of the finest professional observatories around the planet.

The key to GaBany's images is long exposures. For some images, he'll focus on the same object for more than 20 hours over the course of several nights, building up dozens of separate images. He can then merge these together, "stacking" them into a single, high-resolution image that contains the best data from all the component images. Some of his finest photographs are used by research astronomers who need to conduct some science while waiting for "big" telescope time.

GaBany tells new astrophotographers to search out the darkest possible skies and use the heaviest, steadiest mount you can afford.

When Tom Davis chose his observation spot he used the same technique as the world's biggest observatories do -- get above the atmosphere. His Starsearch Observatory is perched high up in the mountains of Idaho, at an elevation of meters 5, feet.Distant Suns It can be very difficult to identify planets, stars, and clusters at home from your backyard, especially if you are a beginner. But hey, there's an app for that, of course. Astronomy apps are making it possible for anyone to be astronomer — you don't even need a telescope.

The apps use the GPS and compass in your phone to pinpoint your location and show you where all the surrounding celestial bodies are, even if your view is blocked. Most of the apps don't even need an Internet connection to function so you can take them on camping trips.

Just open the app, point your smartphone at the sky, and the app will identify the planets and stars around you. We've browsed through some of the top-rated astronomy apps and put together a list of the ones that look the most awesome. Whether you are an aspiring astronomer or just a casual backyard stargazer, these 11 apps can help you locate planets, stars, and galaxies — no telescope required. SkySafari can display a map of the sky from any location and shows how positions of celestial bodies change up to one million years into the past or future.

It uses images collected from NASA spacecraft and the Hubble Space Telescope to show you the major planets and moons in the solar system. The app also gets you a subscription to SkyWeek: a magazine that tells you about upcoming eclipses and meteor showers. Starmap has aboutstars, galaxies and clusters, and 50 asteroids and dwarf planets. The app gives you the "night's best selection" so you know what you should be looking for on any given night and it identifies shooting star zones. This app is also a point and locate that uses the iPhone's compass to identify the planets and stars right in front of you.

You can zoom in on a particular object and the app has a night vision mode — the backlight on your phone dims and the images on the screen glow red so your night vision isn't ruined. Pocket Universe is an especially great app for beginners. You can point your phone up at the sky to identify planets and stars near you, but the app also provides a list of suggested objects to observe based on the date.

It even gives you a list of observation tips. Pocket Universe also has quizzes you can take on the planets, stars, and constellations so you can see how much you're learning. The Solar Walk app includes an interactive model of the galaxy. You can tap on planets and stars to learn about their trajectories, structural make up, and the history of their exploration. The app also lets you plug in a specific date, past or present, and it will display how the planets were aligned.

Solar Walk also has 3D models of some of the man made satellites orbiting in space. Deluxe Moon lets you keep track of the moon phases, what zodiac sign the moon is in, daily moonrise and moonset times, and what distance the moon is from the Earth.

You'll never miss another full moon or lunar eclipse. All you have to do is point your phone at the night sky, and Star Walk locates and pinpoints the exact location of the celestial object you want to see. You can use the precise location to find the object in your telescope. You can access information about every celestial body that shows up in the app. It also includes a calendar of upcoming celestial events so you can plan your next stargaze.

Takahashi FS60 Refractor Telescope - Mini Telescope for Serious Astronomy

Star Chart is similar to Star Walk, but its free. You can also manually set the location to see what the sky looks like from the other side of the planet. It displays stars and planets in real time and it includes a time shift feature that lets you see what the sky will look like 10, years into the past or future. Distant Suns is also a point and locate app and has information on overstars.

It uses images from the Hubble Space Telescope and includes data and information on everything you observe. It also provides you with weather updates so you know when your view might be blocked by clouds. You can keep up with the latest space news from Astronomy Magazine using the app. This app has gotten some pretty impressive reviews: its average is five out of five stars.

The NASA app is a great resource for details on the latest space exploration missions. It also provides tons of breathtaking NASA images and information about celestial bodies.All online orders will continue to be processed and shipped with our delivery partners who uphold high hygiene standards.

Take care and remember to keep a social distance! JavaScript seems to be disabled in your browser.

Backyard Stargazers: Giant Telescopes for Serious Hobbyists

You must have JavaScript enabled in your browser to utilize the functionality of this website. Featuring a selection of high powered, large Refractor, Maksutov- Cassegrains and 8", 10", 12" inch Dobsonian Telescopes for professionals and those who engage in serious astronomy.

OpticsCentral is able to Price Match some Australian retailers on telescopes and sports optics we can NOT price match cameras and accessories.

As a part of our Price Match policy, we hope to be able to provide the best price we can for our customers without undercutting ourselves. We try to provide competitive pricing when possible, but cannot always guarantee the best price.

We make up for any discrepancy in price differences by aiming to provide superior customer service! A few basics in regards to our Price Match policy:. Please note this is a price match Policy and not a price match Guarantee. We make no promises on matching any competitor prices.

Also find out any shipping costs which apply, and make sure the product is definitely in stock with the competitor. Check that the competitor is carrying Australian products. A list of suppliers we can price match can be found below. If in doubt, contact our supplier and find out if they supply the competitor with that particular product.

Check our costing. The competitor may have leftover promotional stock that we can not price match. If our cost price is too high, we will not be able to match them in price. At OpticsCentral, we want you to be happy with your purchase!

If you have any problems with your order within 30 days of purchase, we are happy to help you out with an Exchange or Refund. No problem! If you would like to return an item to us for an Exchange or Refund, we are happy to do so within 30 days of purchase as long as the item is in its original condition with all of the original packaging. Simply contact our Customer Service team via the Contact Us page or call us on and we will issue you with a Return Authority for your product.

Please note that return shipping is at the expense of the customer and Refunds will exclude the original shipping fees. Sometimes packaging errors can occur - we are human afterall! If you have any issues with your order, please contact our Customer Service team via the Contact Us page or call us on within 30 days of receiving your order and we will issue you with a Return Authority for your product.

Once assessed by our team and the item is found faulty or we have made a mistake, we are certainly happy to provide you with an Exchange or Refund. Return shipping for Faulty or Incorrect products is FREE, and we will send out the replacement at no additional cost to you.

Please allow weeks for your item to be returned to us and assessed. Refunds will be made or exchanges finalised during this time.

Gift Vouchers Available All Products. Shop By. For Serious Astronomy.A photon leaps off the sun and, about seconds later, bounces off our Earth.

Light has been dancing and rebounding from faraway and nearby celestial objects for more than 13 billion years. It's time you caught some of it for your very own. That's what telescopes do; they gather light. But to collect that radiance, you'll need to pick the telescope that fits your needs and budget. Our editors have selected a few of the best options in five categories. Click on each to read reviews of the telescopes in these groups:.

Toy store telescopes are mostly junk. Here are some highlights:. Type: Reflector Aperture: mm Magnification: x Weight: 13 lbs. Big aperture, good-quality optics and easy operation bring the solar system — and the deep sky beyond — directly to your young astronomer. A well-coated, 4. The celestial-image-adorned steel tube and its moving parts are very durable. This telescope comes with a free download of Starry Night astronomy software. You can use Starry Night to plan observing sessions and for fun learning day or night.

Type: Refractor Aperture: 50mm Magnification: 4x Weight: 4. You get kid-size versions of instruments to extend vision to the very big, the very faraway and the very small. A 2-inch aperture refractor telescope works at night for moon, planets and stars, and during the day for animals and sports. A three-objective microscope x, x and x brings the sub-visible to giant size.

Type: Reflector Aperture: 76mm Magnification: x Weight: 4. The optical tube is decorated with the names of noteworthy astronomers throughout history, inspiring kids even when it's sitting on their desk or on a shelf indoors. It comes with two eyepieces 20 millimeters and 4 mm for wide and close-up views. An optional accessory kit adds a finder scope, anti-glare moon filter, two more eyepieces and downloadable astronomy software for PC and Mac. Remarkably fine optical quality at a very low price makes this surprising telescope a great choice for kids with an interest in the night sky.


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